WE ALL NEED BRANDING

“I’m not a professional looking for clients, Sandy,” Todd, an IT Project Manager looking for a new position told me last week, “but I was told you can help me.”

We arranged to talk on the phone.

“My problem is that there are hundreds of applicants for every position,” he continued. “I interview well, but we’re always down to two or three applicants and one of them gets chosen.”

Listening to Todd, I was struck by how the need for “branding” is everywhere. It’s not just a business issue.

Most simply put, branding is taking a look at who you want to attract and then designing everything you do to attract them, to differentiate yourself from others, and to be consistent with everything else you do-from your logo to your website to how you dress and speak and what you say.

If you brand yourself successfully, you’re not just the best among a client’s (or employer’s) choices, you are the only logical choice.

In Todd’s case, I saw that his resume, his cover letter, everything, made him appear just like all the other project managers. He had more experience than many, but when he applied for jobs where the additional experience wasn’t essential, it just made him more expensive.

I asked Todd to identify a specific type of work he wanted to do. It turns out that a lot of his experience involved a very narrow field involving security projects.

We redesigned his resume to make him the only logical choice for a company that needed this kind of experience and Todd started to apply only to companies and contractors that might want to use his particular expertise.

Within a month, Todd had branded himself as the expert in this field and was being interviewed against a field that narrowed quickly to just a few candidates. While Todd doesn’t have his position yet, it’s only a matter of time now-not chance.

If you’re a therapist who tells people that she helps her clients with any emotional or relationship problem, you are at a distinct disadvantage when a couple looking for counseling talks with someone who specializes in working with couples.

Like Todd, you need to make the following decisions:

(1) Who do I want to work with?
(2) What core problem do I want to help them solve?
(3) What do I need to do to convince them that I am their solution?

Once you have these figured out, you just need to persist until people recognize your brand.

I help independent professionals and entrepreneurs who are good at what they do but are struggling to grow their practices. We get them to stop struggling and start attracting all the great clients they deserve.

Don’t wait another day to get the help you need. Contact me.

In the meantime, keep REACHING…

Sandy